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Video: What are NANOSENSORS Membrane-type Surface-stress Sensors (MSS) for R&D in gas/odor sensing?

The NANOSENSORS™ Membrane-type Surface-stress Sensor – MSS is a non-packaged MEMS sensor, a silicon membrane platform supported with four beams on which piezoresistors are embedded. It is mainly dedicated to R&D in the areas of olfactory sensing and electronic noses but some types can also be used for static/pulsed-field torque magnetometry and force sensing.

The MSS offered by NANOSENSORS via the Special Developments List are raw sensor platforms intended to provide researchers with a platform for their research so that they don’t have to start their setup from scratch. The MSS sensors will still need to be coated with detection layers developed and applied by the individual researchers in order to become functional sensors.

There are currently two major applications for this type of sensor:

  •  the MSS has a great potential as a core component for electronic (artificial) nose systems / olfactory sensing systems utilized in e.g. food, environment, safety and security and medical ( e.g. human breath analysis ) fields.
     NANOSENSORS offers two types of MSS sensors for this application.: SD-MSS-1K2G and SD-MSS-1K2GP.
    The recently introduced SD-MSS-1K2GP can also be employed for “liquid” or “wet” applications thereby extending the potential use of MSS sensors to R&D in the sensing of taste, detections of chemical reactions in solutions, etc.

  •  the MSS can also be used for assessment of various materials like organic conductors, magnetic and superconductor materials in torque magnetometry.
    NANOSENSORS currently offers three MSS sensors which can be used for this type of application: SD-MSS-1KTM, SD-MSS-1KPMAl and SD-MSS-1KPMAu.

To find out more please have a look at the video, the NANOSENSORS™ MSS webpage or the NANOSENSORS™Special Developments List.

On these pages you will not only get more information on which types of MSS Sensors are currently available but you will also find further information on the NANOSENSORS™ MSS 8 Channel Readout Module ( MSS-8RM ). The MSS-8RM is a basic electronic module to operate and to readout NANOSENSORS™ MSS that can be integrated in the researchers own set-up.

NANOSENSORS adds new Membrane-type Surface-stress Sensors (MSS) type for liquid applications to Special Developments List

The Membrane-type Surface-stress Sensor (MSS) is a device to detect specific components in gaseous phase with high sensitivity using a piezoresistive nanomechanical sensor. This device shows great potential as a core component for artificial- (electric-) nose sensors/systems utilized in e.g., medical, food, environment, safety and security fields.

The working principle of the MSS is as follows:
A receptor layer coated on the silicon membrane of a nanomechanical sensor yields surface stress upon absorption/adsorption of target molecules. Small beams supporting the membrane are then mechanically deformed and the integrated piezoresistors on the beams change their resistance. By monitoring the changes in resistance, one can detect the presence of the target molecules. The receptor material determines the sensitivity and the specificity of the device in detecting the target molecules.

Now NANOSENSORS™ has added a new MSS sensor type, the “SD-MSS-1K2GP” – a nanomechanical sensor based on the MSS technology – to its Special Development list (http://www.nanosensors.com/pdf/SpecialDevelopmentsList.pdf).

The “SD-MSS-1K2GP” is basically identical to the “SD-MSS-1K2G”, which was introduced in 2017, except that the aluminum electrodes of the SD-MSS-1K2GP are covered with a silicon oxide layer.

The piezoresistors of the SD-MSS-1K2GP are covered with silicon nitride as the already introduced “SD-MSS-1K2G” model. Thus, the “SD-MSS-1K2GP” can be employed for “liquid” or “wet” applications. This feature extends the possibilites of usage for the MSS sensors, for example sensing of taste, detections of chemical reactions in solutions, etc.

Please note that the MSS Sensors platforms that NANOSENSORS offers are no plug-and-play devices. They are raw sensor platforms intended to support researchers in the fields of smell/odor sensing with a platform for their research so that they don’t have to start their setup from scratch. The MSS sensors will still need to be coated with detection layers by the individual researchers in order to become functional sensors.

For further technical information, price or delivery times please contact us at info(at)nanosensors.com

NANOSENSORS Membrane-type Surface-stress Sensors (MSS) type for liquid applications “SD-MSS-1K2GP” – top view of sensor platform. This is the raw sensors platform. It still needs to be coated with a detection layer by the individual researcher in order to become a fully functional sensor.
NANOSENSORS Membrane-type Surface-stress Sensors (MSS) type for liquid applications “SD-MSS-1K2GP” – top view of sensor platform
NANOSENSORS Membrane-type Surface-stress Sensors (MSS) type for liquid applications “SD-MSS-1K2GP” – close-up view of sensor platform, support beams. This is the raw sensor platform. The MSS will still need to be coated with a detection layer by the individual researcher in order to become a fully funtional sensor.
NANOSENSORS Membrane-type Surface-stress Sensors (MSS) type for liquid applications “SD-MSS-1K2GP” – close-up view of sensor platform, support beams

Signal Origin of Electrochemical Strain Microscopy and Link to Local Chemical Distribution in Solid State Electrolytes

Solid state electrolytes (SSEs) are interesting materials that could potentially replace the currently used organic electrolytes in lithium‐ion batteries (LIBs). *

Electrochemical strain microscopy (ESM), a research technique based on atomic force microscopy (AFM), was developed to locally probe ion movement in electrodes based on electro-chemo-mechanical coupling measure through the AFM cantilever deflection. It can be used to characterize Li-ion mobility in energy materials with extremely high spatial resolution. *

The main challenge with ESM is its nonquantitative nature due to complex AFM cantilever dynamics in contact mode when performed on resonance as well as signal contribution that are not necessarily related to ions such as electrostatic forces.*

In the article “ Signal Origin of Electrochemical Strain Microscopy and Link to Local Chemical Distribution in Solid State Electrolytes “ Nino Schön, Roland Schierholz, Stephen Jesse, Shicheng Yu, Rüdiger‐A. Eichel, Nina Balke and Florian Hausen investigate the exact signal formation process of electrochemical strain microscopy (ESM) when it is applied on sodium super ionic conductor (NASCIO)-type solid state electrolytes containing Na- and Li-ions.*

In their research the authors correlatively use various scanning probe microscopy (SPM) based microscopy techniques together with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy ( EDX ) at identical positions of the solid state electrolyte LATP.*

They find that changes in the dielectric properties are responsible for the detected contrast in the deflection of the AFM cantilever instead of a physical volume change as a result of Vegard’s Law. The AFM cantilever response is strongly reduced in areas of high sodium content which is attributed to a reduction of the AFM tip-sample capacitance in comparison with areas with high lithium content.*

This is the first time a direct link between electrostatic forces in contact mode and local chemical information is demonstrated on SSEs. The results presented in the article open up the possibility to learn more since dielectric properties are sensitive to subtle changes in local chemical composition.*

NANOSENSORS conductive Platinum-Iridium coated PointProbe® Plus PPP-EFM AFM probes were primarily used in the research for this article.

Figure 1 from Nino Schön et al. «Signal Origin of Electrochemical Strain Microscopy and Link to Local Chemical Distribution in Solid State Electrolytes”:
a) Topography, b) deflection error, and c) corresponding cantilever deflection change (Dac) map of a 30 µm × 30 µm area of LATP. d) Noncontact EFM amplitude map in the same area.
NANOSENSORS conductive platinum-iridium coated PointProbe Plus PPP-EFM AFM probes were used.
Figure 1 from Nino Schön et al. «Signal Origin of Electrochemical Strain Microscopy and Link to Local Chemical Distribution in Solid State Electrolytes”:
a) Topography, b) deflection error, and c) corresponding cantilever deflection change (Dac) map of a 30 µm × 30 µm area of LATP. d) Noncontact EFM amplitude map in the same area.

*Nino Schön, Roland Schierholz, Stephen Jesse, Shicheng Yu, Rüdiger‐A. Eichel, Nina Balke, Florian Hausen
Signal Origin of Electrochemical Strain Microscopy and Link to Local Chemical Distribution in Solid State Electrolytes
Small Methods, Early View, Online Version of Record before inclusion in an issue 2001279
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1002/smtd.202001279

Please follow this external link to read the full article: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/smtd.202001279

Open Access The article “Signal Origin of Electrochemical Strain Microscopy and Link to Local Chemical Distribution in Solid State Electrolytes” by Nino Schön, Roland Schierholz, Stephen Jesse, Shicheng Yu, Rüdiger‐A. Eichel, Nina Balke, Florian Hausen is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.